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  Playing Fair: The Story of Fairtrade Footballs                                      

   Background Information

 

A new short film taking a behind the scenes look at making footballs was produced for KS2 and KS3 students by the Fairtrade Foundation, in time for kick off for Euro 2016 and the Homeless World Cup.

 

Football is a multi-billion dollar sport yet those at the other end of the supply chain – football makers - don’t earn enough to afford a basic family budget. 

 

Shot in London and Pakistan, the film takes students on a journey to meet football workers and stitchers from Fairtrade-certified factories in Sialkot, Pakistan, where 70% of the world’s hand-stitched footballs are made.

 

Through commentary, accompanied by free style kicks, by Frankie Vu, a live sports presenter for CBBC, and interviews with the football makers, students will learn about the challenges they face, various stages of football production, and the positive impact of Fairtrade.

 

The film and PDF presentation draws on issues in global trade, such as low wages and child labour, whilst inspiring a discussion on how a modern consumer can drive change. Download film here: http://schools.fairtrade.org.uk/resource/journey-fairtrade-football/  and accompanying power point presentation here: intranet.fairtrade.org.uk/fairfile/index.php/s/uqLzkyp6G111sbM/download

 

There are over 180 million people living in Pakistan and over 20% are living in poverty, on less than $1.25 a day. 40 million footballs are made in the factories of Sialkot each year – this rises to 60 million in a World Cup year.

 

Fairtrade helps tackle poverty by working with companies to ensure viable wages, good working conditions and the Fairtrade Premium that is used for vital community projects, such as building schools and hospitals.

 

Kate Jones, Education Campaigns Manager, said: “Football is the world’s most popular game, and one that unites people around the world. Yet, for all the promotion of fair play in the beautiful game, behind the scenes for many it is a different experience – football makers are often forgotten across the supply chain, living in poverty, working in poor conditions and earning low wages. Fairtrade is working to change this and make the game fair for everyone involved. 

The film engages students in one of the untold stories behind football and gets them to reflect on the causes and effects of poverty, and think about what they can do to make trade work for everyone. We hope teachers across the UK will use the resource during Euro 2016, and beyond.”

 

Fairtrade balls will be for the first time used during the Homeless World Cup 2016, held in July in the UK. Bala Sport, a cooperative from Glasgow, who provides the Fairtrade balls for the event, works with the football makers in Pakistan.  

 

Angus Coull, Joint MD, Bala Sport said: “Fairtrade balls mean that the fairness and respect towards players and fans that is encouraged by football governing bodies is extended to the football makers. It’s fantastic that students across the UK will get to hear the story of the people behind Fairtrade sport balls and see the very positive impact our ball purchases have on their lives. We hope film will spread the word about Fairtrade’s contribution to football and lead to a much better life for more sports ball workers.”

 

Perveen, football worker said: “With the Fairtrade Premium, we bought school bags and school books for children. We set up two water filtration plants because there was a problem with access to clean water. There are now also eye tests for workers to help people who suffer from eye-related problems and headaches.”

 

The film was made in response to a survey that the Fairtrade Foundation conducted in 2015 with Fairtrade schools asking what commodities they would like learning resources about. Sports balls scored very high, as they are used in every school which makes them interesting for children and young people.

 

 

The Fair Trade In Football Campaign was founded by Sharron Hardwick, a keen Fairtrade and football fan who supports local schools and clubs, and Sialkot stitching communities teaching about and promoting Fairtrade stitched footballs.  Share your Fairtrade Football activities and get resources from:  www.fairtradeinfootball.com

Schools have been a big part of the Fairtrade movement. There are currently 1,800 Fairtrade Schools in the UK, and that number continues to rise thanks to the support of dedicated teachers and students. Download and order free classroom materials at www.fairtrade.org.uk/schools See how schools can become part of the Fairtrade movement. 

 

Playing Fair: The Story of Fairtrade Footballs

 

  Questions

 

1. If workers in developing countries do not get paid fairly for their work, what effects can this have?

 

2. How many products carry the Fairtrade Mark?

 

3. Of the 180 million people living in Pakistan what percentage live on $1 to $2 dollars a day?

 

4. How many footballs are made in Sialkot, Pakistan:

a. In a non World Cup year?  b. In a World Cup Year?

 

5. How many pentagons and hexagons make a typical football?

 

6. What 3 ways can footballs be made?

 

7. How many balls can a good stitcher make up to in a day?

 

8. Once a ball is stitched name 2 of the follow up processes it goes through.

 

9. How many people in Sialkot, Pakistan, are involved in the football stitching industry?

 

10. Why did Sialkot hit the headlines in 1996?

 

11. What was signed in 1997 ?

 

12. How did this agreement change production?

 

13. What does Fairtrade aim to do for football workers?

 

14. What are Fairtrade premiums?

 

15. Name the committee that represents the Fairtrade football workers?

 

16. List some examples of how the Fairtrade Committee used Fairtrade Premiums to benefit Fairtrade workers, their families and the local community?

 

17.  If we choose to buy Fairtrade stitched footballs, or any Fairtrade items, what does this mean for the workers and their families?

 

 

 

 

Playing Fair: The Story of Fairtrade Footballs             

 

 Questions And Answers

 

1. If workers in developing countries do not get paid fairly for their work, what effects can this have?

 

Answer: Workers struggle to feed their families, can not afford to send their children to school or buy medication.

 

2. How many products carry the Fairtrade Mark?

 

Answer: 4,500

 

3. Of the 180 million people living in Pakistan what percentage live on $1 to $2 dollars a day?

 

Answer: 20%

 

4. How many footballs are made in Sialkot, Pakistan:

a. In a non World Cup year?

b. In a World Cup Year?

 

Answer: a. 40 million b. 60 million

 

5. How many pentagons and hexagons make a typical football?

 

Answer: 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons.

 

6. What 3 ways can footballs be made?

 

Answer: Hand stitching, machine stitching and thermal bonding.

 

7. How many balls can a good stitcher make up to in a day?

 

Answer: up to 5.

 

8. Once a ball is stitched name 2 of the follow up processes it goes through.

 

Answers: Fitting the bladder, cleaning, checking size, weight and bounce, deflated and boxed for shipping.

 

9. How many people in Sialkot, Pakistan, are involved in the football stitching industry?

Answer: Around 40,000 people in Sialkot work in the production of  footballs. That is almost a quarter of the population.

 

 

 

 

Playing Fair: The Story of Fairtrade Footballs             

 

 Questions And Answers

 

10. Why did Sialkot hit the headlines in 1996?

 

Answer: Reports of 7,000 children being involved in child labour.

 

11.  What was signed in 1997 ?

 

Answer: An agreement to stop high rates of child labour in football production.

 

12. How did this agreement change production?

 

Answer: Football stitching at home was abolished and production moved to factories.

 

13. What does Fairtrade aim to do for football workers?

 

Answer: Help people to move out of poverty and get better lives. Guarantee workers: a fair deal, safe working conditions, no child labour keeping children out of school, workers rights and Fairtrade premiums.

 

14. What are Fairtrade premiums?

 

Answer: For the sale of each Fairtrade stitched football extra money is paid to be used to fund community projects.

 

15. Name the committee that represents the Fairtrade football workers?

 

Answer: Fairtrade Premium Committee.

 

16. List some examples of how the Fairtrade Committee used Fairtrade Premiums to benefit Fairtrade workers, their families and the local community?

 

Answers: Built a water filtration system, transport for workers, books and school bags, free eye clinic, fairly priced shop.

 

17.  If we choose to buy Fairtrade stitched footballs, or any Fairtrade items, what does this mean for the workers and their families?

 

Answer: Fairtrade helps to improve life for workers by guaranteeing a better deal, fair wages, safe working conditions, with no child labour that prevents children from attending school. Fairtrade provides Fairtrade Premiums which are used to support and develop local communities.